Wednesday, July 28, 2010

TN Congressman Marsha Blackburn Votes Poorly

Fiscal 2003 Omnibus Appropriations.
The final version (conference report) of House Joint Resolution 2 would provide $397 billion in fiscal 2003 for all Cabinet departments and government agencies covered in 11 unfinished spending bills from the 107th Congress. The bills included are: Agriculture, Commerce-Justice-State, District of Columbia, Energy and Water Development, Foreign Operations, Interior, Labor-HHS-Education, Legislative Branch, Transportation, Treasury-Postal Service, and VA-HUD. The problem with the omnibus approach is that thousands of unconstitutional activities are lumped together with legitimate legislation in one massive bill.
Thus, big government is perpetuated with a minimum of accountability.  The House adopted the conference report on H. J. Res. 2 on February 13, 2003 by a vote of 338 to 83 (Roll Call 32).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-1 (Source: The New American, July 14, 2003)

Budget Resolution — Final Version.
The final version (conference report) of the budget resolution (House Concurrent Resolution 95) would authorize federal spending for fiscal 2004 of $1,861 billion dollars with a deficit of $558 billion and an increase in the public debt ceiling of $984 billion. This planned deficit of $558 billion dwarfs the previous record federal deficit of $290 billion in 1992. The $984 billion increase in the public debt ceiling authorized in this bill constituted, under Rule XXVII of the House, approval of the debt limit increase bill (House Joint Resolution 51) without having to cast a separate vote just on increasing the debt ceiling. Subsequently the Senate passed H. J. Res. 51 and President Bush signed it into law, increasing the public debt ceiling by $984 billion (for a new total of $7.4 trillion) and giving Congress a green light to continue its fiscally irresponsible ways. This resolution also includes $400 billion for a Medicare prescription drug benefit for 2004-2013. The House adopted the conference report on H. Con. Res. 95 on April 11, 2003 by a
vote of 216 to 211 (Roll Call 141).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-1 (Source: The New American, July 14, 2003)


Special Education.
This bill (H. 1350) would reauthorize the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. One its provisions would authorize increasing federal grants to defray more of the cost of educating special education students, from the current 18 percent to percent by 2010. Other provisions would allow school personnel to discipline special education students the same as nondisabled students, reduce paperwork requirements for special education teachers, and limit parents’ ability to sue school districts. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that H.R. 1350 would cost $50 billion over the 2004-2009 period. The House passed H.R. 1350 on April 30, 2003 by a vote of 251 to 171 (Roll 154). 
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-1 (Source: The New American, July 14, 2003)


Global AIDS Initiative.
This bill (H.R. 1298) would authorize $15 billion ($3 billion annually) for fiscal years 2004 through 2008 to provide assistance to foreign countries for the stated purpose of combating HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. Much of this funding will be funneled through the Global AIDS Fund and other UN agencies and programs notorious for promoting abortion, as well as encouraging promiscuity through “sex education” courses supposedly aimed at stemming AIDS. The House passed H.R. 1298 on May 1, 2003 by a vote of 375 to 41 (Roll Call 158).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-1 (Source: The New American, July 14, 2003)


Job Training.
This bill (H.R. 1261) would reauthorize the nation’s main job-training program. One of its provisions would allow faith-based groups to receive federal funds while maintaining their religious identity, including hiring based on religious preferences. The Congressional Budget Office estimates this bill would increase “mandatory” spending by $17 billion for the years 2006-2011 and “discretionary” spending by $31 billion over the years 2004-2008. The House passed H.R. 1261 on May 8, 2003 by a vote of 220 to 204 (Roll Call 175).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-1 (Source: The New American, July 14, 2003)


Unemployment Benefits.
This bill (H.R. 2185) would extend the Temporary Extended Unemployment Compensation Act of 2002 through December 31, 2003. This would provide an additional 13 weeks of federal aid to workers in all states who have exhausted their 26 weeks of state unemployment benefits. It would also provide another 13 weeks of federal benefits to workers in states with high unemployment. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that H.R. 2185 would increase federal outlays by a total of $7.9 billion over the fiscal years 2003 and 2004. The House passed H.R. 2185 on May 22, 2003 by a vote of 409 to 19 (Roll Call 223). Federal aid to unemployed workers is unconstitutional. 
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-1 (Source: The New American, July 14, 2003)


Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations.
This bill (H.R. 2660) would appropriate $470 billion for the Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Departments for fiscal 2004, a 10 percent increase over fiscal 2003. This bill, the biggest of the fiscal 2004 domestic spending bills, includes $138 billion for discretionary spending, including $55.4 billion for education and $22.7 billion for the National Institutes of Health. That leaves $332 billion for so-called mandatory spending on entitlement programs such as Medicare, Medicaid, and unemployment insurance. The House passed H.R. 2660 on July 10, 2003 by a vote of 215 to 208 (Roll Call 353).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-2 (Source: The New American, December 29, 2003)


Agriculture Appropriations.
This bill (H.R. 2673) would appropriate $77.5 billion for agriculture, rural development and nutrition programs in fiscal 2004. Over half of the money appropriated by this “agriculture” bill is earmarked for so-called mandatory spending on nutrition programs, including $28 billion for food stamps and $16 billion
for school lunch and other nutrition programs. Total spending for traditional agricultural programs is $26.8 billion, a 5 percent increase. The House passed H.R. 2673 on July 14, 2003 by a vote of 347 to 64 (Roll Call 358).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-2 (Source: The New American, December 29, 2003)


Ban on UN Contributions.
This amendment to H.R. 1950 (Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005) by Rep  Ron Paul (R-Texas) stated that “none of the funds authorized … by this Act may be obligated or expended to pay any United States contribution to the United Nations or any affiliated agency of the United Nations.” The House rejected this amendment to H.R. 1950 on July 15, 2003 by a vote of 74 to 350 (Roll Call 364).
Marsha Blackburn Voted AGAINST this bill.
108-2 (Source: The New American, December 29, 2003)



FY2004 Foreign Operations Appropriations.
HR 2800.  Foreign aid bill includes $1.4 billion to combat HIV/AIDS in Africa and $800 million for the new Millennium Challenge Account. Unconstitutional. (Passed 370-50 on July 24, 2003, roll call #429.) Cost: $17.1 Billion
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.


U.S.-Singapore Trade.
This bill (H.R. 2739) would implement a trade agreement to reduce tariffs and trade barriers between the United States and Singapore. A similar bill, the U.S.-Chile Trade Agreement (H.R. 2738), was presented to Congress at the same time as the U.S.-Singapore Trade Agreement. These are the first in a series of bilateral and regional free trade agreements (FTAs) that the Bush administration is negotiating, which will culminate in 2005 in the largest and most significant FTA of them all, the Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA). The model for the FTAA is the European Union (EU), formerly the “Common Market,” which has grown by design from a supposed free trade agreement into a supranational government for Europe. The world order architects intend for the FTAA to follow the same trajectory for the Americas. The House passed H.R. 2739 on July 24, 2003 by a vote of 272 to 155 (Roll Call 432).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-2 (Source: The New American, December 29, 2003)


U.S.-Chile Trade.
This bill (H.R. 2738) would implement a trade agreement to reduce tariffs and trade barriers between the United States and Chile. The significance of this trade agreement is like that of the U.S.-Singapore Trade Agreement described above. The House passed H.R. 2738 on July 24, 2003 by a vote of 270 to 156 (Roll Call 436). 
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-2 (Source: The New American, December 29, 2003)


Supplemental Spending for Iraq & Afghanistan. 
The final version conference report) of H.R. 3289 would appropriate $87.5 billion in supplemental fiscal 2004 spending for military operations and reconstruction in Iraq and Afghanistan. This is the largest supplemental that Congress has ever passed. Of this total, military operations would receive $65.8 billion. Iraq reconstruction would be funded by grants totaling $18.6 billion, while reconstruction in Afghanistan would receive $1.2 billion. William Norman Grigg predicted in the March 24 issue of  The New American  magazine that “the impending war on, or occupation of, Iraq is intended to carry out the UN Security Council mandates, not to protect our nation or to punish those responsible for the September 11th attack. The war would uphold the UN’s supposed authority and vindicate its role as a de facto world government.” In its November 20 report on President Bush’s speech at London’s Whitehall Palace the Guardian of London provided a concise confirmation of  Mr. Grigg’s prediction in its headline “Iraq war saved the UN, says president.” Now American taxpayers must pay tens of billions of dollars, hundreds of billions ultimately, for this latest military intervention to empower the UN. The House adopted the conference report on H.R. 3289 on October 31, 2003 by a vote of 298 to 121 (Roll Call 601).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-2 (Source: The New American, December 29, 2003)


Flood Insurance Reauthorization.
HR 253.  Authorizes an additional $450 million for flood insurance and flood-loss mitigation. Unconstitutional federal activity. (Passed 352-67 on Nov. 20, 2003, roll call #655.) Cost: $450 Million FY2004-2008.
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.


Prescription Drug Benefit.
The final version (conference report) of H.R. 1 would create a prescription drug benefit for Medicare recipients. Beginning in 2006, prescription coverage would be available to seniors through private insurers for a monthly premium estimated at $35. There would be a $250 annual deductible, then 75 percent of drug costs up to $2,250 would be reimbursed. Drug costs greater than $2,250 would not be covered until out-of- pocket expenses exceeded $3,600, after which 95 percent of drug costs would be reimbursed. Low-income recipients would receive more subsidies than other seniors by paying lower premiums, having smaller deductibles, and making lower co-payments for each prescription. The total cost of the new prescription drug benefit would be limited to the $400 billion that Congress had budgeted earlier this year for the first 10 years of this new entitlement program. The House adopted the conference report on H.R. 1 on November 22, 2003 by a vote of 220 to 215 (Roll Call 669). 
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-2 (Source: The New American, December 29, 2003)

Child Nutrition Programs.
This bill (H.R. 3873) would reauthorize through fiscal 2008 several child nutrition programs, including the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs, the Child and Adult Care Food Program, and the After- school Snack Program. The Congressional Budget Office estimates that H.R. 3873 would increase direct spending on these programs by about $226 million over the 2004-2008 period. Since obesity in school-age children has greatly increased since 1980, the school lunch program reauthorization bill has become a popular vehicle for proposals aimed at reducing obesity. This bill would require schools to develop “wellness policies” that establish nutritional guidelines for all food sold in schools; however, it stops short of setting mandatory federal standards. The House agreed to the motion to suspend the rules and pass H.R. 3873 on March 24, 2004 by a vote of 419 to 5 (Roll Call 82).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-3 (Source: The New American, July12, 2004)

Fiscal 2005 Budget Resolution.
This resolution (House Concurrent Resolution 393) would establish broad spending and revenue targets over the next five years. It calls for $871.3 billion in “discretionary” spending (including $50 billion for supplemental funding of operations in Iraq) and another $1.5 trillion in “mandatory” spending for fiscal 2005. Based on these targets, the “mandatory” spending portion of the budget would increase by 5 percent over last year, and the total budget — a whopping $2.4 trillion — would increase by 3 percent  This resolution projects that the budget deficit would be cut significantly by fiscal 2009 (from $376.8 billion in fiscal 2005 to $234 billion in fiscal 2009); however, according to a Congressional Quarterly Fact Sheet, “Budget Resolution for FY 2005,” these projected deficits are deceptively low due to an accounting sleight-of hand whereby “these deficits are calculated by using the surpluses in the Social Security trust funds to offset spending on other programs. If these Social Security surpluses are not counted, the projected deficits in each fiscal year would be $550.7 billion in FY 2005 and $471.8 billion in FY 2009.” The House adopted this resolution on March 25, 2004 by a vote of 215 to 212 (Roll Call 92).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-3 (Source: The New American, July12, 2004)


Surface Transportation.
This bill (H.R. 3550) would authorize $284 billion in federal aid for highway, mass transit, and safety and research programs for fiscal years 2004-2009. This total includes $217 billion for highways, $51.5 billion for mass transit, and $11.1 billion for House members’ transportation projects. The Bush administration had wanted to limit the spending in the bill to $256 billion, which, noted White House spokesman Scott McClellan, would still increase spending by 21 percent. But the House added an additional $28 billion to the bill (11 percent more than the president had requested). The House passed H.R. 3550 on April 2, 2004 by a vote of 357 to 65 (Roll Call 114).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-3 (Source: The New American, July12, 2004)

Job Training and Worker Services.
This bill (H.R. 444) would authorize the creation of “personal re-employment accounts” of up to $3,000 for unemployed workers at risk of exhausting their state unemployment benefits. Money in this account could be used for such expenses as education, childcare, healthcare or transportation. Those workers who find a job within 13 weeks would be allowed to take the balance in their account as a “reemployment bonus.” This bill would authorize $50 million in fiscal 2005 for these “personal re-employment accounts.” The House passed H.R. 444 on June 3, 2004 by a vote of 213 to 203 (Roll Call 225).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-3 (Source: The New American, July12, 2004)

Agriculture Appropriations.
This bill (H.R. 4766) would appropriate $83.7 billion for agriculture, rural development, and nutrition programs in fiscal 2005. Over half ($50.2 billion) of the funding in the so- called agriculture appropriations bill would be for domestic food and nutrition programs, including $33.6 billion for the food stamp program and $11.3 billion for child nutrition programs. Another $27 billion would be for agriculture programs, including $16.5 billion for the Commodity Credit Corporation. The House passed H.R. 4766 on July 13, 2004 by a vote of 389 to 31 (Roll Call 370).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-4 (Source: The New American, November 1, 2004)

Millennium Challenge Account.
During consideration of the foreign aid appropriations bill (H.R. 4818), Rep. Ron Paul (R- Texas) offered this amendment to eliminate all of the funding for the Millennium Challenge Account. H.R. 4818 would provide $1.25 billion for this account in fiscal 2005, 25 percent more than in fiscal 2004, for the purpose of rewarding nations for progress in human rights, economic policy, and democracy. During floor debate, Paul noted that this year-old program was originally viewed as a transition from one form of foreign aid to another,” but it instead “was just added on.” The House rejected Paul’s amendment on July 15, 2004 by a vote of 41 to 379 Roll Call 383).
Marsha Blackburn Voted AGAINST this bill.
108-4 (Source: The New American, November 1, 2004)

Foreign Aid.
The foreign aid appropriations bill (H.R. 4818) would provide $19.4 billion in fiscal 2005, an 11 percent increase over fiscal 2004 funding. The House passed H.R. 4818 on July 15, 2004 by a vote of 365 to 41 (Roll Call 390).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-4 (Source: The New American, November 1, 2004)

Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations.
This mammoth appropriations bill (H.R. 5006) would provide $496.6 billion in fiscal 2005, including $374.3 billion for the Department of Health and Human Services, $60.3 billion for the Department of Education, and $14.9 billion for the Department of Labor. Total fiscal 2005 appropriations would be 3.5 percent higher than fiscal 2004 appropriations. The House passed H.R. 5006 on September 9, 2004 by a vote of 388 to 13 (Roll Call 440).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
108-4 (Source: The New American, November 1, 2004)

Debt Limit Increase.
S 2986. Passage. Increases the national debt limit to $8.18 trillion. Fiscally irresponsible annual federal deficits approaching $0.5 trillion have led to a rapid increase in the public debt.
(Passed 208-204 on Nov. 18, 2004, roll call #536.) Cost: $800 Billion
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.



Fiscal 2005 Omnibus Appropriations.
HR 4818. Conference Report. Combines in one all-or-nothing vote nine appropriations bills. This minimizes accountability and masks widespread unconstitutional spending!
(Adopted 344 – 51, on Nov. 20, 2004, roll call #542.) Cost: $388.4 Billion.
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.


Vocational/Technical Training.
This bill (H.R. 366) would reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act, which funds vocational and technical education programs. The bill would authorize $1.3 billion in fiscal 2006 and “such funds as necessary” in fiscal 2007-11. It would also merge Perkins funding with “Tech-Prep,” a program that provides certain math and science courses to high school students to “ease the transition” from high school to a vocational or community college. The House passed this bill on May 4, 2005 by a vote of 416-9 (Roll Call 154).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-1 (Source: The New American, August 8, 2005) 


Supplemental Appropriations.
The final version (conference report) of this supplemental appropriations bill H.R. 1268) would add another $82 billion to the federal budget for fiscal 2005. The supplemental  pending, even if needed and constitutional, should not have been added on to the annual federal budget after the fact, but should have been included as part of the regular appropriations process. The supplemental spending in this bill includes $75.9 billion for defense-related purposes, most of it for the military occupation of Iraq, and $907 million for tsunami victims, the latter clearly unconstitutional. One particularly objectionable element of this legislation is the REAL ID Act, which was added to the supplemental appropriations bill by the conference committee. The REAL ID Act would authorize the federal government to impose national standards for driver’s licenses and thereby develop a national ID system. The House adopted the final version of H.R. 1268 on May 5, 2005 by   vote of 368-58 (Roll Call 161).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-1 (Source: The New American, August 8, 2005)


WTO Withdrawal.
Representatives Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Ron Paul (R-Texas) sponsored this measure (House Joint Resolution 27) to withdraw the United States from the World Trade Organization. The WTO is often portrayed as a “free trade” arrangement by its supporters, but it is actually an international bureaucracy that manages trade and imposes its rulings on member nations including the United States — even when those rulings are contrary to U.S. laws.  In fact, U.S. membership in the WTO is unconstitutional, since under our   Constitution, Congress — not an international body — “shall have the power … to regulate foreign commerce.” That power cannot be transferred short of a constitutional amendment. The House rejected the WTO withdrawal measure on June 9, 2005 by a vote of 86-338 (Roll Call 239).
Marsha Blackburn Voted AGAINST this bill.
109-1 (Source: The New American, August 8, 2005)


UN Dues Decrease.
During consideration of the Commerce-Justice appropriations bill (H.R. 2862), Rep. J.D. Hayworth (R-Ariz.) offered an amendment to cut the U.S. “contribution” to the United Nations by $218 million. The House rejected Hayworth’s amendment on June 15, 2005 by a vote of 124- 304 (Roll Call 253).
Marsha Blackburn Voted AGAINST this bill.
109-1 (Source: The New American, August 8, 2005)



UN “Reforms.”
On the surface, this United Nations “reform” bill (H.R. 2745) appears to be a  conservative” get tough response to UN corruption. It would withhold up to 50 percent of U.S. dues to the UN unless the UN makes certain operational changes, and many “conservatives” voted for it. In reality, the legislation calls for strengthening the UN in the name of “reform.” Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) warned in his June 13 Texas Straight Talk column that the “reform” bill supports creation of a “Peace building Commission,” which “will serve as the implementing force for the internationalization of what were formerly  internal affairs of sovereign nations.”  The House passed the UN “reform” bill on June 17, 2005 by a vote of 221-184 (Roll Call 282).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-1 (Source: The New American, August 8, 2005)


Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations.
This mammoth social welfare appropriations bill (H.R. 3010) would provide a total of $601.6 billion in fiscal 2006 for the Labor Department ($14.8 billion), the Education Department ($63.7 billion), the Health and Human Services Department ($473.8 billion), and related agencies. The bill is by far the largest of the 11 appropriations bills written
by the House this year. In total, H.R. 3010 would provide a 21 percent increase over
a similar appropriations bill for the previous year. The House passed this bill on June 24,
2005 by a vote of 250-151 (Roll Call 321).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005)



Foreign Aid.
This appropriations bill (H.R. 3057) would provide $20.3 billion for U.S. foreign aid  programs in fiscal 2006. The House passed the foreign aid bill on June 28, 2005 by a vote of 393-32 (Roll Call 335).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005)



Patriot Act Reauthorization.
In the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Congress passed the so-called Patriot Act, which gave law enforcement and intelligence agencies vast new powers to combat terrorism. The act expanded the list of crimes deemed terrorist acts; increased the ability of law enforcement to secretly search homes and business records; expanded the FBI’s wiretapping and surveillance authority; and provided for nationwide jurisdiction for search
warrants and electronic surveillance devices, including the legal extension of those devices to e-mail and the Internet. The bill included a “sunset” provision under which the new surveillance powers “shall cease to have effect on December 31, 2005.” The Patriot Act reauthorization bill (H.R. 3199) considered by the current Congress would make permanent 14 of the 16 provisions set to expire at the end of this year and extend for 10 years the remaining two provisions. The House passed the reauthorization on July 21, 2005 by a vote of 257-171 (Roll Call 414).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005)


CAFTA.
This bill (H.R. 3045) would implement the proposed Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA), thereby expanding the devastating consequences of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), including the job losses wrought by NAFTA.
CAFTA is intended by the Power Elite to be a steppingstone from NAFTA to the proposed Free Trade Area of the Americas (FTAA), which would include all of the countries of the Western Hemisphere except (for now) Cuba. Like NAFTA, which has already begun imposing its trade rulings on America, CAFTA and the FTAA would not be genuine free trade arrangements; they would instead manage trade and would gradually exercise more powers on the road to a supranational government modeled after the European Union.
The House passed CAFTA on July 28, 2005 by a vote of 217-215 (Roll Call 443).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005)

Surface Transportation. 
The final version (conference report) of this bill (H.R. 3) would authorize $286.5 billion
for federal highway, mass transit, and safety and research programs through fiscal 2009. The bill is laden with thousands of “pork barrel” transportation projects requested by individual lawmakers. The House adopted the final version of this legislation on July 29, 2005 by a vote of 412-8 (Roll Call 453).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005)


Katrina Hurricane-relief Appropriations.
In the wake of the devastating hurricane disaster in the Gulf Coast, Congress quickly passed legislation that would appropriate $51.8 billion in emergency supplemental funding for fiscal 2005 (H.R. 3673) to be used for relief in the areas affected by Hurricane Katrina. Commenting on how the tragic images of Katrina were used to justify more federal welfare and interventionism, as opposed to private charity and initiatives, Rep. Ron
Paul (R-Texas) noted on September 15, after the House and Senate votes: “These
scenes prompted two emotional reactions. One side claims Katrina proved there was
not enough government welfare.... The other side claims we need to pump billions of new dollars into the very federal agency that failed (FEMA).... Both sides support more authoritarianism, more centralization, and even the imposition of martial law in times of natural disasters.” The House passed the Katrina appropriations bill on September 8, 2005 by a vote of 410-11 (Roll Call 460).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005)


Head Start Funding.
This legislation (H.R. 2123) would reauthorize the Head Start program through fiscal 2011 and provide $6.8 billion for the program in 2006. The bill would also increase educational standards for Head Start teachers. The House passed the Head Start bill on September 22, 2005 by a vote of 231-184 (Roll Call 493).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005)



Foreign Aid.
The final version (conference report) of this appropriations bill (H.R. 3057) would provide $21 billion for U.S. foreign aid programs in fiscal 2006. The House passed the final version of this legislation on November 4, 2005 by a vote of 358-39 (Roll Call  569).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-3 (Source: The New American, July 10, 2006)
Patriot Act Reauthorization.
This is the final version (conference report) of the Patriot Act reauthorization (H.R. 3199). In the weeks following the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Congress quickly passed the so-called Patriot Act, which gave law enforcement and intelligence agencies vast new powers to combat terrorism. The act increased the ability of law enforcement to secretly search home and business records, expanded the FBI’s wiretapping and surveillance authority, and expanded the list of crimes deemed terrorist acts. When passed in 2001 the bill included a “sunset” provision under which the new surveillance powers “shall cease to have effect on December 21, 2005.” The Patriot Act reauthorization bill (H.R. 3199) considered by Congress last year would make permanent 14 of the 16 provisions included in the bill, and extend for four years the two remaining provisions. The House passed the final version of the bill to reauthorize the Patriot Act on December 14, 2005 by a vote of 251-174 (Roll Call 627).  
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-3 (Source: The New American, July 10, 2006)


Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations.
This massive social-welfare appropriations bill (H.R. 3010) would provide $601.6 billion in fiscal 2006 for the Labor Department ($14.8 billion), the Education Department ($63.5 billion), the Health and Human Services Department ($474.1 billion), and related agencies. H.R. 3010 is the largest of the appropriations bills considered by Congress this year. In total, H.R. 3010 would provide a 21 percent increase over a similar appropriations bill for fiscal 2005.  The House passed the bill on December 14, 2005 by a vote of 215- 213 (Roll Call 628).
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
109-3 (Source: The New American, July 10, 2006)



Defunding the NAIS.
Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) introduced this amendment to the fiscal 2007 agriculture appropriations (H.R. 5384). Paul’s amendment would bar the use of funds in the bill to implement the National Animal Identification System (NAIS), a government program that would electronically track farm cattle and poultry in hopes of preventing the spread of disease. Writing about the program, Paul stated, “NAIS means more government, more regulations, more fees, more federal spending, less privacy, and diminished property rights.” The House rejected Paul’s amendment on May 23, 2006, by a vote of 34-389 (Roll Call 184).
Marsha Blackburn Voted AGAINST this bill.
109-3 (Source: The New American, July 10, 2006)



Foreign Aid.
The fiscal 2007 foreign aid appropriations bill (H.R. 5522) would authorize $21.3 billion for foreign operations and economic assistance in fiscal 2007. Though foreign aid is supposed to help the poor and suffering in other countries, it instead has served to prop up economically deficient socialist regimes and to transfer wealth from American taxpayers to third-world elites. The House passed H.R. 5522 on June 9, 2006 by a vote of 373-34 (Roll Call 250). Foreign aid is unconstitutional and unworkable.
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American - October 30, 2006)


Iran Military Operations.
Representative Maurice Hinchey (DN.Y.) offered this amendment to the 2007 Defense appropriations bill (H.R. 5631). The amendment would bar any funds to initiate military operations in Iran unless it is in accordance with Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, which delegates to Congress alone the power to declare war. The House rejected Hinchey’s amendment by a vote of 158-262 on June 20, 2006 (Roll Call 300). The power to declare war belongs to Congress, not to the president, and that much power should not be in the hands of one man.
Marsha Blackburn Voted AGAINST this bill.
(Source: The New American - October 30, 2006)



Line-item Rescission.
The legislative line-item rescission bill (H.R. 4890) would allow the president to propose cuts in spending bills already enacted by Congress. The cuts would then receive an up-or-down vote with no opportunity to filibuster or add amendments. The House passed H.R. 4890 by a vote of 247-172 on June 22, 2006 (Roll Call 317). The rescission bill, though not a full-fledged line-item veto, would still shift some legislative power from Congress to the president, disrupting the U.S. system of checks and balances.
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American - October 30, 2006)


Oman Trade Agreement.
The Oman Free Trade Agreement (H.R. 5684) would reduce most tariffs and duties between Oman and the United States H.R. 5684 was considered under fast track authority, which requires Congress to expedite consideration of presidentially negotiated trade pacts without offering amendments. The Oman agreement is just one steppingstone in the White House’s effort to form a Middle Eastern Free Trade Area (MEFTA) by 2013. These so-called free trade agreements have historically failed because they encourage the relocation of U.S. jobs to foreign countries so that the companies can get cheap labor. Meanwhile, they don’t provide the United States with trade benefits — largely because the people in those countries cannot afford to buy our products —  hereby harming the U.S. economy. The agreements also put our economic destiny in the hands of unelected foreign bureaucrats, such as those at the World Trade Organization. The House passed H.R. 5684 by a vote of 221-205 on July 20, 2006 (Roll Call 392). Such trade agreements damage the U.S. economy and threaten U.S. sovereignty by the imposition of international regulations.
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American - October 30, 2006)


Military Tribunals.
 This bill (H.R. 6166) would authorize a new system of military tribunals to try persons designated “unlawful enemy combatants” by the president. The bill defines an unlawful enemy combatant to include a person who “has purposely and materially supported hostilities against the United States or its co-belligerents.” Once designated an unlawful enemy combatant, a defendant’s rights would be curtailed: he would be denied the right of habeas corpus; he could be detained indefinitely; and evidence obtained through coercion could be used against him — so long as the coercion falls outside the administration’s definition of torture. Critics of the tribunals bill are planning to file suit in order to test the constitutionality of the legislation. This legislation was in  response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s June 29 ruling on the case of Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, which declared that the administration’s current system for trying military detainees was unconstitutional. The House passed the military tribunals bill on September 27, 2006 by a vote of 253-168 (Roll Call 491). This bill would curtail defendant rights. The Senate passed this legislation the following day.
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American - October 30, 2006)


Electronic Surveillance.
The warrantless electronic surveillance bill (H.R. 5825) would allow electronic surveillance of communications with suspected terrorists without first obtaining approval from the secret courts established by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978. Furthermore, the bill would authorize unwarranted surveillance for up to 90 days in some instances if a threat was considered “imminent.” Intelligence agencies would be allowed to conduct warrantless surveillance for seven days prior to gaining court approval if the threat was considered an “emergency situation.” This controversial bill had full support of the Bush administration as a means to provide greater national security in a post-9/11 world. The House passed H.R. 5825 on September 28, 2006 by a vote of 232-191 (Roll Call 502). Such a law would violate the Fourth Amendment by subjecting U.S. citizens to unreasonable searches and seizures.
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American - October 30, 2006)



Head Start Funding.
The Head Start reauthorization bill (H.R. 1429) would authorize $7.4 billion for the Head Start program in fiscal 2008. The bill would also disburse “such sums as may be necessary” for fiscal years 2009-2012. The bill would also place more strict requirements on Head Start teachers, such as requiring them to have completed a bachelor’s degree by 2013. The funding for the Head Start program is up from the $6.9 billion that it received in fiscal 2007. The House passed this bill on May 2, 2007, by a vote of 365-48 (Roll Call 285). The bill perpetuates a federally funded educational program, and federal aid to education is unconstitutional.  
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 23, 2007)


Iraq Troop Withdrawal.
This bill to withdraw U.S. troops and Defense Department contractors from Iraq (H.R. 2237) was purely a symbolic bill with little chance of passage by the House. The bill would require the withdrawal of troops and contractors to begin within 90 days of the bill’s enactment, and to be completed within 180 days from the beginning date of the withdrawal. The House rejected this bill on May 10, 2007, by a vote of 171-255 (Roll Call 330). According to Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, only Congress can declare war, and consequently our soldiers are not fighting under a constitutional mandate.
Marsha Blackburn voted AGAINST this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 23, 2007)


COPS Funding.
This bill (H.R. 1700) would provide the annual funds for the Community-Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program for fiscal 2008 through 2013. The bill would authorize $1.15 billion per fiscal year to aid in the hiring of law enforcement officers. The funding would include up to $600 million each year for “officers hired to perform intelligence, anti-terror or homeland security duties.” The House passed H.R. 1700 on May 15, 2007, by a vote of 381-34 (Roll Call 348). Providing federal aid to local law enforcement programs is not only unconstitutional, it also further federalizes the police system. The Senate passed a similar provision in March.
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 23, 2007)


Iran Military Operations.
During consideration for the fiscal 2008 defense authorization bill (H.R. 1585), Representative Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) offered this amendment that would require President Bush to get specific congressional authorization before engaging in military operations in Iran. The House rejected the DeFazio amendment in a Committee of the Whole on May 16, 2007, by a vote of 136-288. Power to declare war belongs solely to Congress, not the president. Under Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution, Congress alone has the power to declare war.
Marsha Blackburn voted AGAINST this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 23, 2007)


Funding the REAL ID Act (National ID).
During consideration of the Homeland Security appropriations bill, Representative Brian Bilbray (R-Calif.) offered an amendment to reallocate $150 million of the bill’s funding to provide grant money for assisting states in conforming to the REAL ID Act of 2005. The REAL ID Act requires all states to issue standardized driver’s licenses that would serve as national ID cards. It was supposed to go into effect three years after the enactment of the act, but because of resistance from the states, the deadline has been extended to 2010 for states that request an extension. Once enacted, a federal agency would not be allowed to accept for any official purpose a driver’s license or ID card issued by a state that fails to meet the act’s requirements. The House rejected the Bilbray amendment by a vote of 155-268 (Roll Call 479) on June 15, 2007. The act would effectively create a national ID card.
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – December 10, 2007)


Foreign Intelligence Surveillance.
This bill (S. 1927) would allow warrantless electronic surveillance (eavesdropping) of targets outside the United States regardless of whether they are communicating with someone within the United States. This surveillance had been conducted illegally by the CIA. Under this legislation, communications companies would be required to comply with surveillance requests and would be provided lawsuit protections. The House passed S. 1927 by a vote of 227-183 (Roll Call 836) on August 4, 2007. Warrantless surveillance of American citizens is a violation of the Fourth Amendment provision against “unreasonable searches and seizures.” Although the bill includes a sunset provision causing it to expire after six months, President Bush has already called for making the bill permanent.
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – December 10, 2007)



Thought Crimes.
This bill (H.R. 1955), known as the “Violent Radicalization and Homegrown Terrorism Prevention Act of 2007,” could more aptly be titled the “Thought Crimes Act.” The bill would establish a National Commission on the Prevention of Violent Radicalization and Homegrown Terrorism and establish a grant program to prevent radicalization in the United States. However, critics charge that the bill is a thinly disguised attempt to criminalize dissent, based on the bill’s vague and open-ended language that could be used to trample basic rights to free speech and assembly, and turn legitimate dissent into thought crimes. For instance, the bill defines “violent radicalization” as “the process of adopting or promoting an extremist belief system for the purpose of facilitating ideologically based violence to advance political, religious, or social change.” The bill does not define either “extremist belief system” or “facilitating ideologically based violence.” The bill also states that “the Internet has aided in facilitating violent radicalization, ideologically based violence, and the homegrown terrorism process in the United States by providing access to broad and constant streams of terrorist-related propaganda to United States citizens.” The House passed H.R. 1955 by a vote of 404-6 (Roll Call 993) on October 23, 2007. The bill threatens legitimate dissent.
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – December 10, 2007)


Peru Free Trade Agreement.
The Peru Free Trade Agreement (H.R. 3688) is another in a series of free-trade agreements to transfer the power to regulate trade (and other powers as well) to regional arrangements. Other examples include the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and Central American Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA). However, the Committee on Ways and Means Report accompanying H.R. 3688 noted that “the Peru FTA has become the first U.S. free trade agreement to include, in its core text fully enforceable commitments by the Parties to adopt, maintain, and enforce basic international labor standards, as stated in the 1988 ILO Declaration on Fundamental Principles and Rights at Work.” The ILO, or International Labor Organization, is a UN agency. The House passed the bill by a vote of 285-132 (Roll Call 1060) on November 8, 2007. The Peru FTA and other so-called free-trade arrangements threaten our national independence and (as we’ve seen with NAFTA) harm our economy.
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – December 10, 2007)


Head Start.
The final version (conference report) of H.R. 1429, a bill to reauthorize the Head Start program through 2012, was adopted 381-36 on November 14, 2007 (Roll Call 1090). Head Start provides educational activities and social services for children up to age five from low-income families. The program received $6.9 billion in fiscal year 2007. $7 billion was authorized in the fiscal 2008 omnibus bill, but H.R. 1429 increased funding to $7.4 billion for fiscal 2008, $7.7 billion for 2009, and $8 billion for 2010. The income level at which families are eligible to participate was raised from 100 percent of the poverty level to 130 percent ($26,728 for a family of four) Some members opposed the bill because Head Start grants will not be allowed to faith-based organizations that hire employees on the basis of religious preference. The bill advances the federalizing of the educational system, and federal involvement in education is unconstitutional. 
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 21, 2008)

Economic Stimulus.
H.R. 5140, the Economic Stimulus Act of 2008, passed 385-35 on January 29, 2008 (Roll Call 25). It would provide about $150 billion in economic stimulus, including $101.1 billion in direct payments of rebate checks (typically $600) to most taxpayers in 2008 and temporary tax breaks for businesses. Creating money out of thin air and then spending the newly created money cannot improve the economy, at least not in the long term. (If it could, why not create even more money for rebates and make every American a millionaire?) The stimulus has no offset and thus increases the federal deficit by the amount of the stimulus because the government must borrow the rebate money. A realistic long-term stimulus can only be achieved by lowering taxes through less government and by reducing regulatory burdens.
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 21, 2008)


Farm Bill (Veto Override).
H.R. 6124 would authorize the nation’s farm programs for the next five years, including crop subsidies and nutrition programs. The final version of the legislation provides $289 billion for these programs, including a $10.4 billion boost in spending for nutrition programs such as food stamps. After this legislation was vetoed by President Bush, the House passed the bill over the president’s veto on June 18, 2008 by a vote of 317-109 (Roll Call 417). A two-thirds majority vote is required to override a presidential veto. Federal aid to farmers and federal food aid to individuals are not authorized by the Constitution.
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – October 27, 2008)


Warrantless Searches.
H.R. 6304, the bill to revamp the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), would allow warrantless electronic surveillance, including monitoring telephone conversations and e-mails, of foreign targets, including those communicating with American citizens in the United States. The final version of the bill would not explicitly grant immunity to telecommunications companies that have assisted President Bush’s warrantless surveillance program. But it would require courts to dismiss lawsuits against such companies if there is “substantial evidence” they were insured in writing the program was legal and authorized by the president. The provision would almost certainly result in the dismissal of the lawsuits. The House passed H.R. 6304 on June 20, 2008 by a vote of 293-129 (Roll Call 437). Warrantless searches are a violation of the Fourth Amendment, which protects Americans against unreasonable searches and seizures, and requires that any searches be conducted only upon issuance of a warrant under conditions of probable cause. Moreover, Article I, Section 9 of the Constitution forbids “ex post facto laws” — laws having a retroactive effect.
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – October 27, 2008)


Employee Verification Program.
H.R. 6633 would reauthorize the EVerify (Internet-based) pilot employment eligibility verification program allowing employers to verify employment eligibility of new hires. The program is administered by the Department of Homeland Security, which would be required to provide funding to the Social Security Administration for checking Social Security numbers submitted by employers under the program. The House passed the bill on July 31, 2008 by a vote of 407-2 (Roll Call 557). Social Security numbers were not intended to be used and should not be used as the basis for a national ID database. An alternative measure (H.R. 5515) would have the screening for employment eligibility verification provided by state-administered private companies that already track employee verification for child-support enforcement.
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – October 27, 2008)


Supplemental Appropriations.
The Fiscal 2009 Supplemental Appropriations bill (H.R. 2346) would provide an additional $96.7 billion in “emergency” funding for the current fiscal year over and above the regular appropriations. Included in the funds for H.R. 2346 is $84.5 billion for the ongoing operations in Afghanistan and Iraq, $10 billion for foreign aid programs, and $2 billion for flu pandemic preparation. The House passed H.R. 2346 on May 14, 2009, by a vote of 368-60 (Roll Call 265). The spending is over and above what the federal government had already budgeted, the United States never declared war against Iraq and Afghanistan, and some of the spending (e.g., foreign aid) is unconstitutional.
Marsha Blackburn voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 20, 2009)


Body Imaging Screening.
 During consideration of the Transportation Security Administration Authorization bill (H.R. 2200), Rep. Jason Chaffetz (RUtah) offered an amendment that would prohibit the use of Whole-Body Imaging (WBI) as the primary method of screening at airports. The amendment would allow passengers the option of a pat-down search rather than being subjected to a WBI search that shows extremely intimate details of one’s body. The Chaffetz amendment would also prohibit TSA from storing, copying, or transferring any images that are produced by WBI machines. Since its creation, TSA has become infamous for its meddlesome searches and disregard for an individual’s right of privacy. Evidence shows that corruption and mismanagement have been commonplace within the relatively new federal department for years. The Chaffetz amendment would do very little to scale back the power held by the TSA, but it does offer some hope that our representatives are not wholly unaware of how the TSA and its policies would threaten the privacy of American citizens through a process that has been called a “virtual strip-search.” The House adopted the Chaffetz amendment by a “Committee of the Whole” on June 4, 2009, by a vote of 310-118 (Roll Call 305). Such technology is obtrusive for American citizens and violates our right of protection against unwarranted searches and seizures. 
Marsha Blackburn voted AGAINST this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 20, 2009)


Patriot Act.
This bill (H.R. 3961) would extend by one year three Patriot Act provisions that were set to expire on February 28, 2010. The provisions allow the federal government to exercise wide-ranging surveillance and seizure powers with few limitations. For instance, the records provision allows the government to obtain “any tangible thing” that, it says, has “relevance” to a terrorism investigation. “Relevance” is a much lower standard — if it can even be called a standard at all — than the “probable cause” and a court warrant standard explicitly required by the Fourth Amendment. The House agreed to extend the provisions on February 25, 2010 by a vote of 315-97 (Roll Call 67). These provisions violate the right of the people to (in the words of the Fourth Amendment) “be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures.”
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 5, 2010)



Withdrawing U.S. Soldiers from Afghanistan.
This legislation (House Concurrent Resolution 248) would direct the President to remove the U.S. Armed Forces from Afghanistan within 30 days of enactment, or by the end of the year if the President determines they cannot be safely removed sooner. The House rejected H. Con. Res. 248 on March 10, 2010 by a vote of 65 to 356 (Roll Call 98). The U.S. military presence in Afghanistan cannot be justified on the basis of defending the United States, there has been no declaration of war, and Congress needs to assert constitutional authority to decide when we do go to war.
Marsha Blackburn Voted AGAINST this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 5, 2010)


Supplemental Appropriations.
The supplemental appropriations bill (H.R. 4899) would provide an additional $58.8 billion in “emergency” funding for the current fiscal year (2010). The supplemental appropriations in the bill include $37.1 billion for military operations in Iraq and Afghanistan, $5.1 billion for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and $2.9 for earthquake relief in Haiti. The House passed the bill on July 27, 2010 by a vote of 308-114 (Roll Call 474). The spending is over and above what the federal government already budgeted, Congress never declared war against Iraq and Afghanistan, and some of the spending (e.g., foreign aid) is unconstitutional.
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – October  25, 2010)
Patriot Act Extension.
This legislation (S. 990) extended for four years three provisions of the Patriot Act that were set to expire: the “roving wiretap” provision that allows the federal government to wiretap any number of a suspect’s telephone/Internet connections without specifying what they will find or how many connections will be tapped; the “financial records” provision that allows the feds to seize “any tangible thing” that has “relevance” to an investigation; and the “lone wolf” provision that allows spying on non-U.S. citizens without a warrant. These provisions violate the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, which requires that no warrants be issued “but upon probable cause” (a much higher standard than “relevance”), and that warrants must contain language “particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.” The Patriot Act even allows the FBI to issue warrants called “National Security Letters” without going to a judge, though this provision was not set to expire and therefore was not part of this legislation. The House passed the Patriot Act extension on May 26, 2011 by a vote of 250 to 153 (Roll Call 376). The provisions that were extended, as well as the Patriot Act as a whole, violate the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution.
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – August 8, 2011).


Libya Troop Withdrawal.
House Concurrent Resolution 51 would have directed President Obama, “pursuant to … the War Powers Resolution, to remove the United States Armed Forces from Libya.” The War Powers Resolution bars the President from militarily engaging the armed forces for more than 60 days without congressional approval. Obama had not sought congressional approval for undertaking military action in Libya. Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio), who sponsored H. Con. Res. 51, noted: “In the weeks leading up to the war, the administration had time to consult with the Arab League, the United Nations, the African Union, but apparently had no time to come to this Congress for approval.” The House rejected Kucinich’s resolution on June 3, 2011 by a vote of 148 to 265 (Roll Call 412). Obama’s Libya deployment is now in violation of the War Powers Act’s 60-day requirement for congressional authorization, and it violates the Constitution, which clearly assigns to Congress the power “to declare war.”
Marsha Blackburn Voted AGAINST this bill.
(Source: The New American – August 8, 2011).


Libya. During consideration of the Defense appropriations bill, Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) introduced an amendment to prohibit the use of funds in the bill to carry out military actions against Libya unless Congress declares war against Libya. The House rejected the Kucinich amendment on July 8, 2011 by a vote of 169 to 251 (Roll Call 530). Under Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution only Congress has the power “to declare war.” The Founding Fathers assigned this power to Congress because they did not want a single man deciding when to go to war. Yet President Obama usurped this congressional war-making authority by initiating offensive military actions against Libya without even asking advice from Congress, much less requesting the required declaration of war.
Marsha Blackburn Voted AGAINST this bill.
(Source: The New American – January 9, 2012).


Debt Deal. This legislation (S. 365) provided for an immediate $400 billion increase in the national debt limit, while allowing the President to raise the ceiling an additional $500 billion unless Congress passes a resolution of disapproval. This legislation also established a process for reducing future cumulative deficit projections by up to $2.4 trillion for fiscal years 2012 through 2021, including the establishment of a super-committee tasked with recommending cuts totaling up to $1.5 trillion for the 10-year period. If the super-committee were to fail in recommending at least $1.2 trillion in cuts (and, as we know, the super-committee failed to recommend any cuts), then the legislation would trigger automatic cuts totaling up to $1.2 trillion over 10 years. The debt-raising/deficit-cutting package created the appearance that Congress was doing something to rein in out-of-control spending. But in reality, the total national debt would still increase even if the entire dollar amount of cuts called for in the legislation were identified and enacted, since the cuts are not cuts in the absolute sense but cuts in future budget projections. The national debt would continue to go up, but not as fast as before, for the simple reason that cutting (say) $1.2 trillion over 10 years will not offset projected annual $1 trillion-plus deficits. The House passed S. 365 on August 1, 2011 by a vote of 269 to 161 (Roll Call 690). The debt deal allows both the national debt and spending to continue their upward trajectories. Moreover, the budget process established by the legislation is clearly unconstitutional since no Congress can bind the actions of future Congresses via the so-called automatic cuts.
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – January 9, 2012).


South Korea Trade Agreement.
On a single day — October 12, 2011 — both the House and Senate approved three separate trade agreements with South Korea, Colombia, and Panama. These measures are three more in a series of “free-trade agreements” intended to transfer the power to regulate trade (and eventually other powers too) to super-national arrangements via a step-by-step process. NAFTA is a prime example of such an arrangement. So is the developing continental government now known as the European Union, which is an outgrowth of a free-trade arrangement once called the Common Market. In fact, the Common Market-EU trajectory to regional governance served as a model for the formation of NAFTA. The South Korea agreement, to quote Congressional Quarterly, is “considered the most economically important trade deal since the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement.” The House passed H.R. 3080, the measure to implement the South Korea trade agreement, on October 12, 2011 by a vote of 278 to 151 (Roll Call 783). Agreements such as this one are intended to transfer trade (and other) powers to super-national arrangements binding the United States, despite the fact that under the Constitution only Congress has the power “to regulate commerce with foreign nations.”
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – January 9, 2012). 




Omnibus Appropriations.
This catch-all legislative package (H.R. 2055), which would provide $915 billion in discretionary appropriations for fiscal 2012, is comprised of nine appropriations bills for fiscal 2012 that Congress failed to complete separately — Defense ($518.8 billion), Energy-Water ($32.1 billion), Financial Services ($21.5 billion), Homeland Security ($41.3 billion), Interior-Environment ($29.2 billion), Labor-HHS-Education ($156.3 billion), Legislative Branch ($4.3 billion), State-Foreign Operations ($33.5 billion), and Military Construction-VA ($73.7 billion). The House adopted the final version of this legislation (known as a conference report) on December 16, 2011 by a vote of 296 to 121 (Roll Call 941). Many of the bill’s spending programs — e.g., education, housing, foreign aid, etc. — are unconstitutional. Moreover, passing this mammoth appropriations bill in light of the ongoing trillion-dollar annual deficits is grossly fiscally irresponsible. Furthermore, packaging the appropriations bills for so many large federal agencies into one mega-bill greatly reduces the accountability of the Congressmen to their constituents.
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 9, 2012).


Line-item Veto.
This bill (H.R. 3521) would allow the President to rescind all or part of any dollar amount of funding for discretionary spending items in enacted appropriations bills. Although both houses of Congress would have to approve any such rescissions, they would be forced to do so very quickly by the bill’s expedited procedures, including a prohibition on amendments in both Houses and filibusters in the Senate. This bill dramatically and unilaterally enhances the power of the executive branch. Note that Article I, Section 1 and Article I, Section 7, Clauses 2 and 3, of the U.S. Constitution vest Congress with all legislative powers. Any bill that shifts legislative power away from Congress and to the President is violating the constitutionally defined separation of powers for the legislative and executive branches. A similar line-item veto law was passed when Clinton was President. That one was found to be unconstitutional by the Supreme Court. The House passed H.R. 3521 on February 8, 2012 by a vote of 254 to 173 (Roll Call 46).  Providing any form of line item veto power to the President violates the Constitution’s separation of powers.
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 9, 2012).


 Cyber Intelligence Sharing and Protection Act (CISPA).
This bill (H.R. 3523) would foster information sharing about cyber threats between the federal government and private businesses. Businesses that would participate in this sharing would be protected from lawsuits regarding this sharing of their customers’ private information with the government. According to Violet Blue in an article posted on ZDNet.com on June 8, “Most people familiar with CISPA believe it will wipe out decades of consumer privacy protections and is primarily to give the US government unprecedented access to individuals’ online data and communications.” The House passed H.R. 3523 on April 26, 2012 by a vote of 248 to 168 (Roll Call 192). The CISPA bill would permit government access to the private information of citizens, in violation of the Fourth Amendment “right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures.”
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 9, 2012).


Indefinite Detention.             
Detainee-related language in the National Defense Authorization Act (H.R. 4310) is so sweeping that American citizens accused of being terrorists can be detained by the U.S. military and held indefinitely without habeas corpus and without even being tried and found guilty in a court of law. Rep. Adam Smith (D-Wash.) offered an amendment to strike this language from the bill, but the House rejected Smith’s amendment on May 18, 2012 by a vote of 182 to 238 (Roll Call 270). The War on Terror must not be allowed to destroy constitutional legal protections, including the issuance of a warrant based on probable cause (Fourth Amendment) and the right to a trial (Sixth Amendment).
Marsha Blackburn Voted AGAINST this bill.
(Source: The New American – July 9, 2012). 




Afghanistan Withdrawal (Defense Appropriations Reduction). 
During consideration of the Defense appropriations bill for fiscal 2013 (H.R. 5856), Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Calif.) proposed an amendment to cut overseas military spending by almost $21 billion. The intent behind the amendment was to allow enough funding for an orderly withdrawal from the unpopular war in Afghanistan but not enough to continue the conflict. According to Rep. Lee, the original bill includes over $85 billion for the war in Afghanistan. The House rejected Lee’s amendment on July 18, 2012 by a vote of 107 to 312 (Roll Call 485). The massive expenditure on undeclared foreign wars and nation building is unconstitutional and unaffordable.
Marsha Blackburn Voted AGAINST this bill


FISA.
The proposed FISA Amendments Act Reauthorization Act of 2012 (H.R. 5949) would reauthorize for five years, through 2017, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), which governs electronic surveillance of foreign terrorism suspects. The law allows warrantless surveillance of foreign targets who may be communicating with people in the United States, provided that the secret FISA court approves surveillance procedures. The House passed H.R. 5949 on September 12, 2012 by a vote of 301 to 118 (Roll Call 569). Warrantless surveillance is unconstitutional and violates privacy and individual liberty. While ostensibly carried out only on “foreign suspects” communicating with U.S. citizens, it is difficult to imagine this surveillance not extending to U.S. citizens.
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill. 

Continuing Resolution.
House Joint Resolution 117 would provide continuing appropriations for the federal government from October 1, 2012 through March 27, 2013. This would amount to an annualized rate of $1.047 trillion in “discretionary” spending for regular appropriations, and would include a 0.6 percent increase in funding for most federal programs and agencies. This continuing resolution would also provide nearly $100 billion in war funding and $6.4 billion in advance disaster relief funds. To put this appropriations bill into perspective, consider what the Congressional Budget Office reported on August 22, 2012: “For fiscal year 2012 (which ends on September 30), the federal budget deficit will total $1.1 trillion, CBO estimates, marking the fourth year in a row with a deficit of more than $1 trillion.” This deficit is based on the CBO’s estimates of $2.435 trillion in federal revenue and $3.563 trillion in federal outlays for fiscal 2012. Therefore, 32 percent of every federal dollar spent in 2012 had to be borrowed. For 2011, 2010, and 2009 the shortfall has been 36, 37, and 40 percent respectively. The House passed H. J. Res. 117 on September 13, 2012 by a vote of 329 to 91 (Roll Call 579). Passage of this mammoth continuing resolution provided a way for Congress to perpetuate its fiscally irresponsible, unconstitutional spending habits with a minimum of accountability to its constituents.
Marsha Blackburn Voted FOR this bill.

 

14 Comments:

Blogger G-Funk said...

Mickey- Thanks for your many comments. I believe they might be automated as I have the complete opposite viewpoint from you regarding Congressman Blackburn. I am quite happy that she voted for Global AIDS funding, and against a ban on UN contributions.

9:27 PM, September 14, 2009  
Blogger caheidelberger said...

Thanks for dropping by to comment, Mickey. I disagree with some of your political positions, but your analysis of Rep. Blackburn's un-conservative voting record is right on. The Patriot Act and warrantless searches are definitely not classically conservative, small-government measures. Keep up the good fight!

5:28 PM, September 30, 2009  
Blogger notetaker said...

Mickey, are you saying you think MB's vote on all (I'm thinking specifically of H.R. 1261, which could be viewed as a claw back of some tax revenues for noble purpose) these issues are wrong, or is this just a report card?

10:10 AM, October 18, 2009  
Blogger MickeyWhite said...

Notetaker, I did not post her good votes, and she does have a few (very few). All the one listed here that she voted for are Unconstitutional, and 1261 is in that group.

12:30 PM, October 18, 2009  
Blogger Gazetteer said...

Mickey,

I responded to your comment at my (very Canuckistanian, very non-conservative) place.

Obviously, we are different sides of the fence on the healthcare issue, but I appreciate your stopping by and giving me what you believe is a fact-based analysis of Ms. Blackburn's vote on HR1.

I attempted to respond by pointing out what I believe is a larger truth on that matter.

Thanks for stopping by.

.

1:40 PM, November 08, 2009  
Blogger Rizwan said...

Mickey , You are natural leader to fight against any NAtion problems , corruption and anti legal laws from nations . You will be us senator in wwhite housevery future!!

7:19 AM, July 07, 2010  
Blogger MickeyWhite said...

Thanks Rizwan

7:29 PM, August 03, 2010  
Blogger Serr8d said...

I lurves me some Marsha Blackburn! She's a doll, ya know?

Why you gotta be all down on Marsha?

I'll bet two weeks salary you'd accept a download of a Whole-Body Imaging scan of Marsha Blackburn, you know you would! And spend the rest of the day in your bunk!

Cheers,

Serr

6:20 PM, September 09, 2010  
Blogger yqgpxhm said...

Seems MB was pretty liberal with her spending record until 2009. Wonder what changed?

For her more current voting record, check out www.whatsupwithmarsha.com.

Or go to www.votesmart.org
Or www.aarp.org/yourvote

These are excellent sources for facts on how Marsha has voted and also how her challenger, Greg Rabidoux stands on the issues.

11:41 AM, October 12, 2010  
Blogger MickeyWhite said...

Yes, the 2010 democratic congress is so bad it even makes NeoCon RINO big spending Marsha "Queen of Pork" look better.

8:16 PM, October 12, 2010  
Blogger BJ said...

Mickey, I see that you are in full mode when it comes to Tea Party agendas, while I am a confirmed liberal redneck Independent. But one thing we do have in common, albeit in opposite spheres, is Marsha Blackburn's voting record.

Thanks much and very kindly for your comment on my blog. Hope much to yak at ya some more.

Regards,
BJA

11:15 AM, March 18, 2011  
Blogger MickeyWhite said...

Updated 08/31/2011

9:12 PM, August 31, 2011  
Blogger Jojo P. said...

I like the way lay down your opinions in politics. But there's no permanent friendship in politics.

1:46 AM, March 25, 2012  
Blogger MickeyWhite said...

Updated July 9, 2012.

6:21 PM, July 09, 2012  

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