Saturday, November 13, 2010

Bobby Jindal Voted Poorly


Vocational/Technical Training.
This bill (H.R. 366) would reauthorize the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act, which funds vocational and technical education programs. The bill would authorize $1.3 billion in fiscal 2006 and “such funds as necessary” in fiscal 2007-11. It would also merge Perkins funding with “Tech-Prep,” a program that provides certain math and science courses to high school students to “ease the transition” from high school to a vocational or community college. The House passed this bill on May 4, 2005 by a vote of 416-9 (Roll Call 154). Federal aid to education and job training programs is unconstitutional.  he Senate had passed a similar measure two months earlier.  
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-1 (Source: The New American, August 8, 2005)


Supplemental Appropriations.
The final version (conference report) of this supplemental appropriations bill (H.R. 1268) would add another $82 billion to the federal budget for fiscal 2005. The supplemental spending, even if needed and constitutional, should not have been added on to the annual federal budget after the fact, but should have been included as part of the regular appropriations process. The supplemental spending in this bill includes $75.9 billion for defense-related purposes, most of it for the military occupation of Iraq, and $907 million for tsunami victims, the latter clearly unconstitutional. One particularly objectionable element of this legislation is the REAL ID Act, which was added to the supplemental appropriations bill by the conference committee. The REAL ID Act would authorize the federal government to impose national standards for driver’s licenses and thereby develop a national ID system. The House adopted the final version of H.R. 1268 on May 5, 2005 by a vote of 368-58 (Roll Call 161). The bill contains both unconstitutional spending and the REAL ID Act. The Senate passed identical legislation five days later
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-1 (Source: The New American, August 8, 2005).


WTO Withdrawal.
Representatives Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Ron Paul (R-Texas) sponsored this measure (House Joint Resolution 27) to withdraw the United States from the World Trade Organization. The WTO is often portrayed as a “free trade” arrangement by its supporters, but it is actually an international bureaucracy that manages trade and imposes its rulings on member nations including the United States — even when those rulings are contrary to U.S. laws. In fact, U.S. membership in the WTO is unconstitutional, since under our Constitution, Congress — not an international body — “shall have the power … to regulate foreign commerce.” That power cannot be transferred short of a constitutional amendment. The House rejected the WTO withdrawal measure on June 9, 2005 by a vote of 86-338 (Roll Call 239). Our participation in the WTO is unconstitutional and threatens our sovereignty.
Bobby Jindal voted AGAINST this bill.
109-1 (Source: The New American, August 8, 2005).


UN “Reforms.”
On the surface, this United Nations “reform” bill (H.R. 2745) appears to be a “conservative” get tough response to UN corruption. It would withhold up to 50 percent of U.S. dues to the UN unless the UN makes certain operational changes, and many “conservatives” voted for it. In reality, the legislation calls for strengthening the UN in the name of “reform.” Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) warned in his June 13 Texas Straight Talk column that the “reform” bill supports creation of a “Peace building Commission,” which “will serve as the implementing force for the internationalization of what were formerly internal affairs of sovereign nations.” The House passed the UN “reform” bill on June 17, 2005 by a vote of 221-184 (Roll Call 282). The “reform” bill is a trap, and the solution to the UN threat is not to “reform” the world body but to get the U.S. out.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-1 (Source: The New American, August 8, 2005).

Labor-HHS-Education Appropriations.
This mammoth social-welfare appropriations bill (H.R. 3010) would provide a total of $601.6 billion in fiscal 2006 for the Labor Department ($14.8 billion), the Education Department ($63.7 billion), the Health and Human Services Department ($473.8 billion), and related agencies. The bill is by far the largest of the 11 appropriations bills written by the House this year. In total, H.R. 3010 would provide a 21 percent increase over a similar appropriations bill for the previous year. The House passed this bill on June 24, 2005 by a vote of 250-151 (Roll Call 321). This bill represents a significant increase in spending, and social-welfare programs are unconstitutional. The Senate passed a similar measure four months later.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005).


Foreign Aid.
This appropriations bill (H.R. 3057) would provide $20.3 billion for U.S. foreign aid programs in fiscal 2006. The House passed the foreign aid bill on June 28, 2005 by a vote of 393-32 (Roll Call 335). Foreign aid is unconstitutional. A similar bill was passed by the Senate a few weeks later. 
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005).


Patriot Act Reauthorization.
In the wake of the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Congress passed the so-called Patriot Act, which gave law enforcement and intelligence agencies vast new powers to combat terrorism. The act expanded the list of crimes deemed terrorist acts; increased the ability of law enforcement to secretly search homes and business records; expanded the FBI’s wiretapping and surveillance authority; and provided for nationwide jurisdiction for search warrants and electronic surveillance devices, including the legal extension of those devices to e-mail and the Internet. The bill included a “sunset” provision under which the new surveillance powers “shall cease to have effect on December 31, 2005.” The Patriot Act reauthorization bill (H.R. 3199) considered by the current Congress would make permanent 14 of the 16 provisions set to expire at the end of this year and extend for 10 years the remaining two provisions. The House passed the reauthorization on July 21, 2005 by a vote of 257-171 (Roll Call 414). The Patriot Act tramples on the constitutionally protected rights of U.S. citizens.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005).

Surface Transportation.
The final version (conference report) of this bill (H.R. 3) would authorize $286.5 billion for federal highway, mass transit, and safety and research programs through fiscal 2009. The bill is laden with thousands of “pork barrel” transportation projects requested by individual lawmakers. The House adopted the final version of this legislation on July 29, 2005 by a vote of 412-8 (Roll Call 453). The bill increases transportation spending and is fiscally irresponsible
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005).


Katrina Hurricane-relief Appropriations.
In the wake of the devastating hurricane disaster in the Gulf Coast, Congress quickly passed legislation that would appropriate $51.8 billion in emergency supplemental funding for fiscal 2005 (H.R. 3673) to be used for relief in the areas affected by Hurricane Katrina. Commenting on how the tragic images of Katrina were used to justify more federal welfare and interventionism, as opposed to private charity and initiatives, Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) noted on September 15, after the House and Senate votes: “These scenes prompted two emotional reactions. One side claims Katrina proved there was not enough government welfare.... The other side claims we need to pump billions of new dollars into the very federal agency that failed (FEMA).... Both sides support more authoritarianism, more centralization, and even the imposition of martial law in times of natural disasters.” The House passed the Katrina appropriations bill on September 8, 2005 by a vote of 410-11 (Roll Call 460). Federally financing disaster relief is unconstitutional. Both the House and Senate passed their versions of H.R. 3673 on the same day.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005).


Head Start Funding.
This legislation (H.R. 2123) would reauthorize the Head Start program through fiscal 2011 and provide $6.8 billion for the program in 2006. The bill would also increase educational standards for Head Start teachers. The House passed the Head Start bill on September 22, 2005 by a vote of 231-184 (Roll Call 493). The bill would further federalize the educational system, and federal aid to education is unconstitutional. 
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005).


U.S. Treasury Borrowing.
During consideration of a bill to overhaul the regulation of government-sponsored enterprises, Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) offered this amendment to “eliminate the ability of Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac and the Federal Home Loan Bank Board to borrow from the Treasury.” During floor debate on his amendment, Paul stated, “I hope my colleagues join me in protecting taxpayers from having to bail out Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac when the housing bubble bursts.” The House rejected Paul’s amendment on October 26, 2005 by a vote of 47-371 (Roll Call 544). Paul’s amendment would (in Paul’s words) seek to end a “massive unconstitutional and immoral” transfer of income from working Americans to government-sponsored enterprises.
Bobby Jindal voted AGAINST this bill.
109-2 (Source: The New American, December 12, 2005).


Foreign Aid.
The final version (conference report) of this appro­priations bill (H.R. 3057) would provide $21 billion for U.S. foreign aid programs in fiscal 2006. The House passed the final version of this legislation on November 4, 2005 by a vote of 358-39 (Roll Call 569). For­eign aid is unconstitutional. The Senate passed the same legislation a week later.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-3 (Source: The New American, July 10, 2006).


Patriot Act Reauthorization.
This is the final version (confer­ence report) of the Patriot Act reauthori­zation (H.R. 3199). In the weeks follow­ing the 9/11 terrorist attacks, Congress quickly passed the so-called Patriot Act, which gave law enforcement and intelli­gence agencies vast new powers to combat terrorism. The act increased the ability of law enforcement to secretly search home and business records, expanded the FBI’s wiretapping and surveillance authority, and expanded the list of crimes deemed terrorist acts. When passed in 2001 the bill included a “sunset” provision under which the new surveillance powers “shall cease to have effect on December 21, 2005.” The Patriot Act reauthorization bill (H.R. 3199) considered by Congress last year would make permanent 14 of the 16 pro­visions included in the bill, and extend for four years the two remaining provisions. The House passed the final version of the bill to reauthorize the Patriot Act on December 14, 2005 by a vote of 251-174 (Roll Call 627). The Patriot Act tramples on the constitutionally protected rights of U.S. citizens. The Senate passed the same legislation on March 2, 2006
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-3 (Source: The New American, July 10, 2006).


Labor-HHS-Education Appropri­ations.
This massive social-wel­fare appropriations bill (H.R. 3010) would provide $601.6 billion in fiscal 2006 for the Labor Department ($14.8 billion), the Education Department ($63.5 billion), the Health and Human Services Department ($474.1 billion), and related agencies. H.R. 3010 is the largest of the appropria­tions bills considered by Congress this year. In total, H.R. 3010 would provide a 21 percent increase over a similar appro­priations bill for fiscal 2005. The House passed the bill on Decem­ber 14, 2005 by a vote of 215-213 (Roll Call 628). The bill would provide an increase in spending, and social-welfare programs are unconstitutional.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-3 (Source: The New American, July 10, 2006).


Katrina Funding.
During con­sideration of the 2006 supplemen­tal appropriations bill (H.R. 4939), Rep. Randy Neugebauer (R-Texas) introduced this amendment to eliminate the $19.2 bil­lion appropriated in the bill for Hurricane Katrina relief. Neugebauer argued that thesupplemental Katrina aid, and the sup­plemental funding for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan are separate issues and should be voted on separately. The House rejected the Neugebauer amendment on March 16, 2006 by a vote of 89-332 (Roll Call 57).Iit would have significantly cut uncon­stitutional federally funded disaster relief.
Bobby Jindal voted AGAINST this bill.
109-3 (Source: The New American, July 10, 2006).


Supplemental Appropria­tions.
This legislation (H.R. 4939) would appropriate a whopping $91.9 billion for emergency supple­mental funding in fiscal 2006, including $67.6 billion for the wars in Iraq and Af­ghanistan, $4.3 billion for foreign aid, and $19.2 billion for Hurricane Katrina relief. Congressional Quarterly noted that the funding in the bill “for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan would push to more than $390 billion the war- elated supplemental funds appropriated since Sept. 11. It would be the sixth major emergency spending measure for the Bush administration.” The House passed H.R. 4939 on March 16, 2006 by a vote of 348-71 (Roll Call 65). Even if the spending were con­stitutional — the funding should be voted on as part of the regular appropriations process and not introduced after the fact as “emergency” spending, ignoring fiscal responsibility. The Senate passed a similar supplemental appropriations bill several weeks later.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-3 (Source: The New American, July 10, 2006).

Defunding the NAIS.
Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) introduced this amendment to the fiscal 2007 agriculture appropriations (H.R. 5384). Paul’s amend­ment would bar the use of funds in the bill to implement the National Animal Iden­tification System (NAIS), a government program that would electronically track farm cattle and poultry in hopes of pre­venting the spread of disease. Writing about the program, Paul stated, “NAIS means more gov­ernment, more reg­ulations, more fees, more federal spend­ing, less privacy, and diminished property rights.” The House re­jected Paul’s amendment on May 23, 2006, by a vote of 34-389 (Roll Call 184). The program would unconstitution­ally allocate federal spending, place useless regulations on farmers, and threaten the privacy rights of American citizens.
Bobby Jindal voted AGAINST this bill.
109-3 (Source: The New American, July 10, 2006).


Agriculture Appropriations.
This bill (H.R. 5384) would provide $93.6 billion in fiscal 2007 for the Depart­ment of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration, and related agencies. The funding includes $37.9 billion for the food-stamp program, $13.3 billion for the child-nutrition program, and $19.7 billion for the Commodity Credit Corporation, a federally funded program that aids farmers. The House passed H.R. 5384 on May 23, 2006 by a vote of 378-46 (Roll Call 193). Federal aid to farmers and federal food aid to individuals are not authorized by the Constitution. 
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-3 (Source: The New American, July 10, 2006).


Foreign Aid.
The fiscal 2007 foreign aid appropriations bill (H.R. 5522) would authorize $21.3 billion for foreign operations and economic assistance in fiscal 2007. Though foreign aid is supposed to help the poor and suffering in other countries, it instead has served to prop up economically deficient socialist regimes and to transfer wealth from American taxpayers to third-world elites. The House passed H.R. 5522 on June 9, 2006 by a vote of 373-34 (Roll Call 250). Foreign aid is unconstitutional and unworkable.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-4 (Source: The New American, October 30, 2006).



Iran Military Operations. Representative Maurice Hinchey (D-N.Y.) offered this amendment to the 2007 Defense appropriations bill (H.R. 5631). The amendment would bar any funds to initiate military operations in Iran unless it is in accordance with Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, which delegates to Congress alone the power to declare war. The House rejected Hinchey’s amendment by a vote of 158-262 on June 20, 2006 (Roll Call 300). The power to declare war belongs to Congress, not to the president, and that much power should not be in the hands of one man.
Bobby Jindal voted AGAINST this bill.
109-4 (Source: The New American, October 30, 2006).


Line-item Rescission.
The legislative line-item rescission bill (H.R. 4890) would allow the president to propose cuts in spending bills already enacted by Congress. The cuts would then receive an up-or-down vote with no opportunity to filibuster or add amendments. The House passed H.R. 4890 by a vote of 247-172 on June 22, 2006 (Roll Call 317). The rescission bill, though not a full-fledged line-item veto, would still shift some legislative power from Congress to the president, disrupting the U.S. system of checks and balances.  
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-4 (Source: The New American, October 30, 2006).


Oman Trade Agreement.
The Oman Free Trade Agreement (H.R. 5684) would reduce most tariffs and duties between Oman and the United States. H.R. 5684 was considered under fast track authority, which requires Congress to expedite consideration of presidentially negotiated trade pacts without offering amendments. The Oman agreement is just one steppingstone in the White House’s effort to form a Middle Eastern Free Trade Area (MEFTA) by 2013. These so-called “free trade” agreements have historically failed because they encourage the relocation of U.S. jobs to foreign countries so that the companies can get cheap labor. Meanwhile, they don’t provide the United States with trade benefits — largely because the people in those countries cannot afford to buy our products — thereby harming the U.S. economy. The agreements also put our economic destiny in the hands of unelected foreign bureaucrats, such as those at the World Trade Organization. The House passed H.R. 5684 by a vote of 221-205 on July 20, 2006 (Roll Call 392). Such trade agreements damage the U.S. economy and threaten U.S. sovereignty by the imposition of international regulations. The Senate voted on similar legislation in September.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-4 (Source: The New American, October 30, 2006).


Military Tribunals.
This bill (H.R. 6166) would authorize a new system of military tribunals to try persons designated “unlawful enemy combatants” by the president. The bill defines an unlawful enemy combatant to include a person who “has purposely and materially supported hostilities against the United States or its co-belligerents.” Once designated an unlawful enemy combatant, a defendant’s rights would be curtailed: he would be denied the right of habeas corpus; he could be detained indefinitely; and evidence obtained through coercion could be used against him — so long as the coercion falls outside the administration’s definition of torture. Critics of the tribunals bill are planning to file suit in order to test the constitutionality of the legislation. This legislation was in response to the U.S. Supreme Court’s June 29 ruling on the case of Hamdan v. Rumsfeld, which declared that the administration’s current system for trying military detainees was unconstitutional. The House passed the military tribunals bill on September 27, 2006 by a vote of 253-168 (Roll Call 491). The bill would curtail defendant rights. The Senate passed this legislation the following day.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-4 (Source: The New American, October 30, 2006).



Electronic Surveillance.
The warrantless electronic surveillance bill (H.R. 5825) would allow electronic surveillance of communications with suspected terrorists without first obtaining approval from the secret courts established by the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978. Furthermore, the bill would authorize unwarranted surveillance for up to 90 days in some instances if a threat was considered “imminent.” Intelligence agencies would be allowed to conduct warrantless surveillance for seven days prior to gaining court approval if the threat was considered an “emergency situation.” This controversial bill had full support of the Bush administration as a means to provide greater national security in a post-9/11 world. The House passed H.R. 5825 on September 28, 2006 by a vote of 232-191 (Roll Call 502). Such a law would violate the Fourth Amendment by subjecting U.S. citizens to unreasonable searches and seizures.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
109-4 (Source: The New American, October 30, 2006).



Minimum Wage.
The minimum-wage increase bill (H.R. 2) would increase the federal minimum wage by $2.10 over two years to $7.25 an hour. Senator Ted Kennedy (D-Mass.) had repeatedly attempted to pass a minimum-wage increase in recent years, but the Republican-led Congress had always rejected his minimum-wage amendments. The minimum-wage increase represents one of the first major pushes of the newly elected Democratic Congress and was high up on the 100-hour legislative agenda pushed by House leaders at the beginning of the congressional year. In 1996, the federal minimum wage was increased by 90 cents to the current $5.15 an hour. Though many people believe that raising the federal minimum wage is a solution to national poverty, allowing the market to dictate wages allows entry-level workers to get the experience and job training they need to get higher paying jobs. The House passed H.R. 2 on January 10, 2007, by a vote of 315-116 (Roll Call 18). It is unconstitutional for the government to prohibit citizens from working for less than a government-set wage. The Senate voted on similar legislation three weeks later.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
110-1 (Source: The New American, July 23, 2007).


Head Start Funding.
The Head Start reauthorization bill (H.R. 1429) would authorize $7.4 billion for the Head Start program in fiscal 2008. The bill would also disburse “such sums as may be necessary” for fiscal years 2009-2012. The bill would also place more strict requirements on Head Start teachers, such as requiring them to have completed a bachelor’s degree by 2013. The funding for the Head Start program is up from the $6.9 billion that it received in fiscal 2007. The House passed this bill on May 2, 2007, by a vote of 365-48 (Roll Call 285). The bill perpetuates a federally funded educational program, and federal aid to education is unconstitutional.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
110-1 (Source: The New American, July 23, 2007).  


Iraq Troop Withdrawal.
This bill to withdraw U.S. troops and Defense Department contractors from Iraq (H.R. 2237) was purely a symbolic bill with little chance of passage by the House. The bill would require the withdrawal of troops and contractors to begin within 90 days of the bill’s enactment, and to be completed within 180 days from the beginning date of the withdrawal. The House rejected this bill on May 10, 2007, by a vote of 171-255 (Roll Call 330). According to Article I, Section 8 of the Constitution, only Congress can declare war, and consequently our soldiers are not fighting under a constitutional mandate.
Bobby Jindal voted AGAINST this bill.
110-1 (Source: The New American, July 23, 2007). 


COPS Funding.
This bill (H.R. 1700) would provide the annual funds for the Community-Oriented Policing Services (COPS) program for fiscal 2008 through 2013. The bill would authorize $1.15 billion per fiscal year to aid in the hiring of law enforcement officers. The funding would include up to $600 million each year for “officers hired to perform intelligence, anti-terror or homeland security duties.” The House passed H.R. 1700 on May 15, 2007, by a vote of 381-34 (Roll Call 348). Providing federal aid to local law enforcement programs is not only unconstitutional, but it also further federalizes the police system. The Senate passed a similar provision in March.
Bobby Jindal voted FOR this bill.
110-1 (Source: The New American, July 23, 2007). 


Iran Military Operations.
During consideration for the fiscal 2008 defense authorization bill (H.R. 1585), Representative Peter DeFazio (D-Ore.) offered this amendment that would require President Bush to get specific congressional authorization before engaging in military operations in Iran. The House rejected the DeFazio amendment in a Committee of the Whole on May 16, 2007, by a vote of 136-288. The power to declare war belongs solely to Congress, not the president. Under Article I, Section 8 of the U.S. Constitution, Congress alone has the power to declare war. 
Bobby Jindal voted AGAINST this bill.
110-1 (Source: The New American, July 23, 2007). 


Global Climate Change.
During consideration of the fiscal 2008 Interior appropriations bill (H.R. 2643), Representative Joe Barton (R-Texas) introduced an amendment to strike from the bill nonbinding language calling for a mandatory program to combat global warming. Specifically, this provision of H.R. 2643 expresses “the sense of the Congress that there should be enacted a comprehensive and effective national program of mandatory, market-based limits and incentives” to reduce global greenhouse-gas emissions. An example of so called “market-based limits” would be to allow companies that want to exceed their allowable emissions output to buy permits or allowances from companies that choose not to use their full allotment. The House rejected the Barton amendment, and thereby kept the global warming language in the bill, by a vote of 153-274 (Roll Call 555) on June 26, 2007. Mandatory limits on greenhouse-gas emissions would harm the economy.
Bobby Jindal voted AGAINST this bill.
110-2 (Source: The New American, December 10, 2007). 

2 Comments:

Blogger LawRob said...

How can a Governor vote for or against a bill in the House of representatives?

10:57 AM, January 28, 2013  
Blogger MickeyWhite said...

He was a House member before he was Governor.

11:09 AM, January 28, 2013  

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